June 2015

NEWS AND GUIDANCE

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News and guidance

References

It is that time of year again when people are writing references and a reminder of the legal hazards involved may be appropriate. Expand

It is that time of year again when people are writing references and a reminder of the legal hazards involved may be appropriate. 

A person can make a subject request under the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) to the recipient, although not to the author, of a reference, so ‘confidential’ is not a cover for malpractice. ‘Negligent misstatement’ is a tort (wrong) in law and a claim can be made against the referee if the reference is old or inaccurate and, as a result, the recipient suffers loss.

Other opportunities for claims are that a reference is defamatory, where a damaging and inaccurate reference has been written out of malice, or that an oral or written reference has been given contrary to a settlement agreement. However, discrimination gives the best chance. This claim could either be that a poor reference has been given because a person has made a claim of discrimination (victimisation) or that a reference has been refused for making a claim or for whistleblowing. It is also worth remembering that a school or college is vicariously liable for the actions of its employees: so be sure that your heads of departments are properly trained, too.

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Keeping children safe in education

The DfE has published revised guidance on Keeping Children Safe in Education ( Expand

The DfE has published revised guidance on Keeping Children Safe in Education (see http://tinyurl.com/p9cxb7e). This version has taken account of consultation responses and clarifies and strengthens a number of issues that were raised. Schools should make sure that they have downloaded this most recent version. There are significant clarifications of responsibilities in independent schools and a strengthening of the reporting provisions. The DfE promises further changes, depending on ministerial decisions post-election.

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Shared parental leave regulations

A large firm of lawyers found that 30 per cent of their clients had not read the government guidance to The Shared Parental Leave Regulations 2014 ( Expand

A large firm of lawyers found that 30 per cent of their clients had not read the government guidance to The Shared Parental Leave Regulations 2014 (http://tinyurl.com/nmmtdbe).

On the more hopeful side, 50 per cent claimed to be ‘quite prepared’ for the new rules. It is hoped that the statistics for schools will be better and all schools will have made the necessary amendments to their existing policies. It is also important to check the changes to unpaid parental leave and to adoption leave.

Further information on all of these is available on the ACAS website www.acas.org.uk

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Time limit to police bail

New rules for police bail have been introduced that limit the time for police bail to 28 days unless the circumstances are exceptional. Expand

New rules for police bail have been introduced that limit the time for police bail to 28 days unless the circumstances are exceptional. Beyond three months, it will only be allowed by application to a magistrate. This should help to speed up the resolution of criminal allegations against school staff more in line with the recommended time frame.

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Teacher recruitment crisis

Schools are facing a growing teacher recruitment crisis with nearly half of headteachers who took part in our survey saying that they have vacancies in the core subjects of English, maths and science. Expand

Schools are facing a growing teacher recruitment crisis with nearly half of headteachers who took part in our survey saying that they have vacancies in the core subjects of English, maths and science.

The survey found that 44 per cent of respondents had vacancies in English; 52 per cent in maths; and 50 per cent in science.

The situation is set to worsen due to a fall in the number of graduates as a result of higher university tuition fees; an increase in the number of secondary-age children, which means that more teachers will be needed; and an economic upturn that is creating greater competition to recruit the pool of graduates.

ASCL General Secretary Brian Lightman said, “We need the next government to ensure that schools and colleges can recruit and retain the highest calibre of staff.

“The existing teacher supply model does not work. Schools all over the country are experiencing unprecedented difficulties recruiting trainees, qualified teachers, middle and senior leaders.

“The next government must act urgently to ensure that effective processes are put in place to model numbers of teachers needed in each sector and region and then promote the status and value of teaching as a profession.”

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STRB publishes pay recommendations

The 25th Report of the School Teachers’ Review Body ( Expand

The 25th Report of the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) has been published (see http://tinyurl.com/pyfdyfg).

The report contains recommendations on applying the pay award for teachers due in September 2015. The STRB has recommended an increase of 1 per cent to the minimum of all the pay ranges and allowances in the national pay framework, and an increase of 1 per cent to the maximum of all the pay ranges and allowances, except the main pay range, the leadership pay range and the eight headteacher group pay ranges. It has proposed a 2 per cent uplift to the maximum of the main pay range and no uplift to the maximum of the leadership and headteacher group pay ranges.

ASCL has continued to call for an equal cost-of-living pay rise for all members of the teaching profession that is fully funded by the government. (See our press release online at www.ascl.org.uk/payrise)

Differential pay awards will make movement between schools problematic and could further exacerbate the recruitment crisis affecting many schools.

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What we stand for...

ASCL believes that key to making our schools and colleges world-class is a culture of trust and respect between politicians and the profession. Expand

ASCL believes that key to making our schools and colleges world-class is a culture of trust and respect between politicians and the profession. School and college leaders are absolutely committed to raising standards and want to lead a world-class education system with world-class schools. Huge strides are being made right across the system to continue to raise standards, with school and college leaders at the forefront. Here, we detail ASCL’s current key policy priorities and messages.

Positive messages about education

Key to making our education system world-class is a culture of trust and respect between politicians and the profession.

Schools and colleges are more efftive than they have ever been; most are ‘good’ and ‘outstanding’. While there is more to do, the improvements of the last decade should be recognised and commended.

School and college leaders are committed to driving improvement and raising standards. This should be publicly recognised by politicians and political parties.

More strategic role for government

School and college leaders welcome change that is in the best interests of young people, when it is strategically planned and well communicated.

A five-year vision for the education system – the duration of a government – would help to ensure that change is planned, properly resourced and coherent.

The government’s role in the education system should concentrate on four areas: equitable, sufficient and sustainable funding; a slim, smart and stable accountability system; ensuring a good supply of teachers and promoting the status of teaching; and a fit-for-purpose capital buildings programme.

Other aspects of education policy should be led by independent experts and practitioners. This is a hallmark of a self-improving system.

ASCL will continue to work with school and college leaders and government to create the conditions for a self-improving system, so that ministers and officials feel able to step back and trust practitioners to drive improvement.

Fair funding

Skilled, well-qualified graduates are crucial to the UK’s long-term economic growth. Education is a long-term investment in our nation’s future success.

A priority must be a new funding formula for schools that is equitable, sufficient, sustainable and weighted towards students with the greatest need. Some schools will gain while others will lose, so a three-year transition period is important.

Post-16 funding in colleges and schools has been drastically reduced to a level that threatens to compromise quality of provision. This urgently must be put right.

A five-year budget freeze (flat cash settlement) for schools with ages 5-16 is also putting pressure on the ability to provide a high-quality education.

Inspection reform

Inspection should be part of a slim, stable and smart accountability framework.

A new model of inspection is needed that can make reliable and credible judgements and has the trust and respect of the profession. It should encourage innovation and a growth mindset. Currently schools and colleges feel under pressure to conform to what they believe inspectors want to see.

The inspectorate should have the power to inspect groups of schools in trusts and federations as well as individual institutions.

Inspection should focus on outcomes rather than processes. ASCL would like to see a yearly review of each school that considers a range of outcome measures agreed by the profession. If these are secure, there would be no need for an inspection visit.

It is not appropriate for inspectors to make judgements on behaviour or quality of teaching, as these are subjective and more likely to be unreliable.

Curriculum

Education should be for the common good; every child should be given an equal opportunity to succeed, regardless of background.

School and college leaders must be bold and courageous about developing a broad and deep curriculum that will suit their students’ needs.

This would be made easier if performance measures were not overly reliant on qualifications, and if an agreed progress measure were in place for at least the term of government – five years.

Accountability measures put in place by governments to influence curriculum and assessment decisions and ways of teaching often stifle innovation and lead to a narrow curriculum offer.

A core curriculum framework should be set by an independent panel of experts, which includes practitioners, and reviewed and updated once every five years – the term of government.

Further vocational qualification reform is needed so that they are consistently high-quality and on a par with academic qualifications.

Teacher professionalism

Quality of teaching is the single biggest influence on outcomes. Teachers and leaders should constantly challenge one another and themselves to develop their own practice and professional learning.

We need the highest calibre of staff entering and developing their careers in schools and colleges. Government can support this through a national supply model to ensure that there are enough teachers in each subject and region.

ASCL supports a College of Teaching, independent of government, to set teacher standards and support teacher professional development. An endowment fund from the government would help enable this to happen. These priorities link with ASCL’s long-term vision for a self-improving education system set out in the blueprint Leading the Way (www.ascl.org.uk/blueprint).

We will be working with the incoming government on these issues to ensure that they are priorities and that they are at the forefront of any future policy development.

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Drones

If school or college design and technology staff are thinking of introducing a little more spice into activities by exploring the possibilities of unmanned aircraft, also known as drones, they may like to consider the legal implications and make their students aware of them as well. Expand

If school or college design and technology staff are thinking of introducing a little more spice into activities by exploring the possibilities of unmanned aircraft, also known as drones, they may like to consider the legal implications and make their students aware of them as well.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) states that permission must be obtained to fly a camera- fitted aircraft within congested areas or close to people or property that are not under the operator’s control. The police also have powers to investigate the reckless use of a drone or actions by the operator that commit the offence of threatening to cause damage or personal injury; and the Information Commissioner will of course be interested in breach of data protection laws in any data that has been collected. The guidance on CCTV cameras and images of the public taken outside school premises will be helpful here.

Finally, a private householder has civil court rights to enjoy life and land free of nuisance and to take action for trespass. It would be as well to exercise the precautionary principle in good time...

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Anti-social behaviour

Under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 ( Expand

Under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (see http://tinyurl.com/nljmycc), a variety of different orders and the power to seek a civil injunction will take the place of the anti-social behaviour order (ASBO).

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Education reform

Below is some of the latest information that has been published on education reform that you may find useful: Expand

Below is some of the latest information that has been published on education reform that you may find useful:

Implementing A level reform

ASCL has worked with the DfE and other organisations to produce a factual guide to A level reform (see www.ascl.org.uk/alevelguidance). The guide is designed to support governors, leaders and teachers in schools and colleges to implement the reforms to A level qualifications. It focuses on the change to the overall structure of the qualifications, the decoupling of AS qualifications and the introduction of linear assessment.

It is designed to help schools and colleges to decide how to implement these changes for 2015 and to develop their plans for subsequent years. The document includes a number of case studies that illustrate the different approaches available to schools and colleges.

We recommend that members read ASCL’s own guidance alongside it – see our guidance paper on implementing A level reform www.ascl.org.uk/alevelreform

Assessment without levels

The Commission on Assessment Without Levels has published more detail on what it plans to do (see http://tinyurl.com/pzetovy). One of its key aims is to share information about effective approaches to assessment already being used by schools. If you would like to share the approach that your school is taking, please either contact the commission directly, or email Julie McCulloch, our Primary Specialist, at julie.mcculloch@ascl.org.uk

GCSE reform – remaining subjects for first teaching 2017

Ofqual has published its decisions about which subjects will be reformed for first teaching in 2017, and which subjects will not be reformed. Details can be found in the document entitled Decisions for Completing GCSE, AS and A level Reform – Part 2 (see http://tinyurl.com/nbvu7ck). Ofqual has also published a statement about the decisions (see http://tinyurl.com/qdgex9x).

GCSE and A level reform: communicating with parents

The DfE has published a range of resources explaining the reforms and these have been designed for schools to use with parents or guardians. A DfE visual timeline is available online at http://tinyurl.com/mrc6m6n

The department has also published a PowerPoint presentation with essential information about the main changes and when they will take place (see www.ascl.org.uk/DfEreform).

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ASCL joins forces with university to offer master’s level courses

A unique collaboration between ASCL and the University of Leicester will offer professional courses leading to master’s level degrees. Expand

A unique collaboration between ASCL and the University of Leicester will offer professional courses leading to master’s level degrees.

ASCL and the University of Leicester’s School of Education will develop the new programmes later this year for school business leaders, middle leaders and system leaders, in charge of networks of schools. The programmes will be delivered in collaboration, with coursework assessed by the university.

The initiative was announced by ASCL General Secretary Brian Lightman at our annual conference in March.

Brian said, “It’s an exciting collaboration which highlights the importance that ASCL places on leadership development. The programmes will enhance and enrich our existing provision and best support the leaders of today and in the future.

“Master’s accreditation enables those who take part in our leadership programmes to achieve value-added qualifications which recognise their expertise and engagement.

“It is part of ASCL’s vision to establish a learning ladder of professional development for those in education and the new master’s courses will help to turn that aspiration into reality.

“High-quality professional development is a crucial element in raising standards and creating a world-class education system.”

Professor Glenn Fulcher, Director of the University of Leicester School of Education, said: “ASCL is forward thinking and proactive in providing continuing professional development [CPD] to its members and the education community at large.

“University of Leicester’s School of Education has had a long and productive relationship with ASCL, but this new partnership will provide opportunities for both institutions to further support and develop successful leadership in education.

“This is an example of collaborative provision at its best, and will have wide impact on educational quality in the country’s schools and colleges.”

Look out for further information on these courses in the near future.

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Routes into teaching

In response to requests from school leaders and potential teachers, ASCL has produced a simple guide on the current routes into teaching ( Expand

In response to requests from school leaders and potential teachers, ASCL has produced a simple guide on the current routes into teaching (see www.ascl.org.uk/routes). We hope that this handy route map will simplify an otherwise confusing array of information. The DfE’s Get into Teaching website (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk) has more detail on each route. Please use the route map as a handy resource to help would-be trainees.

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Whistleblowing code of practice

The Department of Business, Innovation & Skills ( Expand

The Department of Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) has published a Code of Practice on Whistleblowing and a 13-page guide for employers (see http://tinyurl.com/q43cyez).

It is understandable that schools and colleges may not have reviewed their whistleblowing policies recently in the flurry of changes around, but it is worth taking this opportunity to revisit them. Whistleblowing is increasingly cited in employment tribunals because it allows a much higher claim to be made.

A key point made in the guide is that whistleblowing must be promoted by the employer, not merely contained in a written policy.

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Fire safety

A recent case of a fire in a hotel as a result of a carelessly discarded cigarette, which led to the prosecution of the manager, is a reminder of the permanent threat to school and college leaders from the law on fire safety. Expand

A recent case of a fire in a hotel as a result of a carelessly discarded cigarette, which led to the prosecution of the manager, is a reminder of the permanent threat to school and college leaders from the law on fire safety. The manager of the premises is the focus of prosecution, although the company behind him or her will usually be prosecuted as well.

There is a statutory defence of having shown ‘due diligence’. This should mean that there are no fire extinguishers holding open doors or flammable materials stacked under staircases or locked escape routes. The school or college safety committee may wish to run a few unheralded spot checks on this; and if they do not, heads or principals, for their own protection, may wish to nudge them in that direction.

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Construction regulations

For those members lucky enough to have scope for capital spending, it is important to know that there are new Construction ( Expand

For those members lucky enough to have scope for capital spending, it is important to know that there are new Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) that mark a significant shift of responsibility for safety on site to the client.

The client is legally required to ensure, among other things, that there are adequate controls; that a contractor is competent; and that there are adequate welfare facilities. Schools and colleges with capital projects of any size should make themselves aware of these changes.

Further information is available on the Health and Safety Executive website: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/ books/l153.htm

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Admissions policy reminder

The allegation that a high-profile school, which is its own admission authority, may have infringed the rule that financial contributions must play no part, directly or indirectly, in the admissions process is a useful wake-up call to any publicly funded school. Expand

The allegation that a high-profile school, which is its own admission authority, may have infringed the rule that financial contributions must play no part, directly or indirectly, in the admissions process is a useful wake-up call to any publicly funded school. The issue appears to have arisen at sixth-form level and it is important to remember that despite the difficulties this may cause, the rules for admission to the sixth-form remain essentially the same as for admissions to the rest of the school.

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Ofsted: Commons Select Committee report

Ofsted bravely welcomed a report by the House of Commons Select Committee on the failings of its inspection of social services in Rotherham, which completely missed the horrifying sexual exploitation that was going on in the area. Expand

Ofsted bravely welcomed a report by the House of Commons Select Committee on the failings of its inspection of social services in Rotherham, which completely missed the horrifying sexual exploitation that was going on in the area. 

The weaknesses identified were that the inspection was ‘too short and too narrowly focused’ and ‘failed to penetrate the professional jealousy and incompetence’ that was infecting the department. It also ‘focused on paperwork rather than practical care’.

These failings will not be unfamiliar to schools and colleges. It is encouraging, however, that Ofsted is trying to move forward and by welcoming this report has sent out a clear message to its inspectors that they must get below the surface and focus on outcomes, not bureaucracy.

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Workplace computers

It was discovered that a number of judges had been removed for accessing pornographic Internet sites on their workplace computers. Expand

It was discovered that a number of judges had been removed for accessing pornographic Internet sites on their workplace computers. There is clearly still a need to make it quite clear that using school or college equipment for these purposes is forbidden. Some government departments go as far as each week giving line managers a list of the sites that their staff have accessed on workplace equipment. The suggestion by a Danish professor that pornography should be exposed to critical interrogation in the classroom to counter the effects on the body-image consciousness and sexual practices of young people may go too far, but there remains a serious challenge for schools to help young people to navigate these difficult waters.

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Electronic information

The shoe retailer Office was given a warning by the Information Commissioner’s Office ( Expand

The shoe retailer Office was given a warning by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) after a hacker got into a historic database. Schools and colleges are retaining increasing amounts of historic information on electronic databases and security is no longer a matter of putting a strong padlock on the archive room door. In this case, the firm was in the process of deleting data and, as a result, its security systems were less effective than usual. About 24 per cent of large organisations report that hackers have attempted to penetrate their systems.

The Serious Crime Act 2015, which includes amendments to the Computer Misuse Act 1990, has received royal assent. It imposes a fine or 14 years imprisonment for causing damage to a computer system. If that system is one where damage may cause damage to welfare (widely interpreted), the environment, the economy or national security, and the person was unauthorised, knew that they were unauthorised and tried to cause serious damage or, alternatively, did so unintentionally but tampered recklessly with the system, then the penalty can be life imprisonment. It is one more legal provision to bring to the attention of young people who think that cyberspace is beyond the law.

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Scottish schools only?

A survey by the Equality and Human Rights Commission ( Expand

A survey by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has produced figures that suggest that 40 per cent of Scottish pupils have been bullied and 60 per cent have been aware of others being bullied. Only 55 per cent had reported this to the school. There is no duty on local authorities (LAs) in Scotland to keep records of alleged bullying.

It is questionable whether this would help or whether the statutory duty on schools in England and Wales to put in place measures to prevent it is, in practice, more effective than Scottish legislation has been. Perhaps it is one more issue where the professional culture of individual schools is more important than the decrees of legislators.

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ACAS Code

ACAS has reissued its guide on discipline and grievances at work ( Expand

ACAS has reissued its guide on discipline and grievances at work (see http://tinyurl.com/yae48c9). In particular, it takes account of recent judgments that mean that the choice of representative in a hearing is the unfettered choice of the employee, provided that the chosen representative fits into one of the categories in the statute. The hearing can go ahead, however, if the representative is not available and his or her absence would cause a five-working-day delay.

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Guidance

Leader contains general guidance on the law. Expand

Leader contains general guidance on the law. If you have a specific legal issue, we recommend that you seek advice from a qualified legal professional.

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In the news

ASCL has been quoted widely in the media over the recent period on a range of issues. Expand

ASCL has been quoted widely in the media over the recent period on a range of issues.

In mid-March, ahead of annual conference, ASCL highlighted the funding gap between schools in different parts of the country (see www.ascl.org.uk/gaps), resulting in widespread media coverage, including BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 4 – Today, The Telegraph, Metro, Daily Mail, TES, ITV News online and BBC News online, as well as many regional newspapers and local BBC radio stations.

Other conference media activity included an interview with President Peter Kent in The Independent, and a double-page feature in TES magazine on a survey carried out by ASCL that showed the impact of the growing funding crisis on schools and colleges. See more online at www.ascl.org.uk/surveyresults

The survey was widely reported in other media – national and regional – as was Peter’s conference speech that warned that children’s education should not be sacrificed on the altar of austerity and called for government to place more trust in the teaching profession. ASCL conference featured in the national headlines on Radio 5 and the station broadcast a discussion with Peter. See our press release online at www.ascl.org.uk/Austerity

Nicky Morgan’s conference speech, in which she disagreed with ASCL about an independent commission on curriculum, was widely reported. We responded with a blog by Brian Lightman published on the TES website (see http://tinyurl.com/pupobvs)

Another blog by Brian ‘Ofsted must step back and schools must step forward’ was published on The Telegraph’s website (see http://tinyurl.com/qy7enno). It followed a speech by Tristram Hunt on the need for a new approach to inspection.

ASCL was also quoted in national media over an Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) report on funding, the need to safeguard young people in danger of being radicalised, a fall in pupil absence rates, the Conservatives’ plans for resits for Year 7 pupils and Labour’s careers advice announcement, among others.

A survey by ASCL focusing on growing problems around teacher recruitment was also widely reported, with articles in the Daily Mail, The Telegraph, The Times and interviews on LBC Radio and several BBC local radio stations. See our press release on this issue online at www.ascl.org.uk/scaleofcrisis

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ASCL Influence

Here is just a small selection of the meetings and lobbying activity that senior ASCL officers have been involved with on your behalf and, in particular, we have highlighted areas where ASCL has had a direct influence on policy. Expand

Here is just a small selection of the meetings and lobbying activity that senior ASCL officers have been involved with on your behalf and, in particular, we have highlighted areas where ASCL has had a direct influence on policy.

Politicians’ response to ASCL’s blueprint

Leading the Way, ASCL’s blueprint for a self-improving system (see www.ascl. org.uk/blueprint), has generated enormous interest and strong support for the vision from policy makers, ministers, officials and their advisers since its publication. President Peter Kent, General Secretary Brian Lightman and senior ASCL officers have been engaged in numerous discussions with the DfE about it. During the period leading up to our annual conference, they briefed special advisers and Ofsted in advance of the keynote speeches, all of which commented on the blueprint.

Peter, Brian and Policy Director Leora Cruddas also took part in a round-table discussion with an influential group of stakeholders to discuss the think piece by BritainThinks on the changing nature of school leadership (www.ascl.org.uk/leadingtheway).

Funding

Funding Specialist Richard Newton Chance has been attending various meetings and highlighting the huge variations in practice between local authorities (LAs) when dealing with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) issues. It is apparent that the same child with a recognised diagnosis will receive a very different classification of need and level of support depending on where they happen to live. We have been emphasising how unfair this is on young people and their parents and how difficult it is for schools to cope with wildly different levels of resource for similar levels of need – yet another place in our funding system where there is a desperate need for fairness and sufficiency.

We are also doing everything we can to push all political parties to commit to a National Fair Funding Formula as soon as possible after the general election. In mid-March, ahead of our annual conference, we highlighted the funding gap between schools and colleges in different parts of the country, resulting in widespread media coverage.

This was also as a direct result of a survey carried out by ASCL, which showed the impact of the growing funding crisis on schools and colleges. The survey received more than 1,000 responses and the results provided a powerful snapshot of the difficulties faced by many schools and colleges. At the time, both Education Secretary Nicky Morgan and Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt referred to funding in their speeches at our annual conference and they were questioned on the issue by delegates.

Our thanks to all those who took part in the survey. See the full results online at www.ascl.org.uk/surveyresults

President Peter Kent also warned that children’s education should not be sacrificed on the altar of austerity and called for government to place more trust in the teaching profession.

Pre-election lobbying

Within the strict rules governing the period following dissolution of Parliament and pending the general election, we continued to engage with key organisations involved in current policies.

General Secretary Brian Lightman and other senior ASCL representatives met with the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) to discuss their latest report, with Ofqual regarding qualification reforms and with Ofsted to discuss implementation of reforms to inspection and about the operation of current ones.

We have also participated in numerous ‘round-table/panel’ events involving members of Parliament and the House of Lords discussing manifesto issues. Brian also spoke at the Freedom and Autonomy for Schools (FASNA) pre-election conference with representatives from the three main parties.

In addition, together with ASCL Council, we have been working to update all of our key policies in line with our blueprint and in preparation for prompt engagement with the new government.

Blueprint for education in Wales

We are working with ASCL Cymru on developing a blueprint for education in Wales and we hope to publish it in September for consultation. Please look out for the blueprint and make sure that you have your say on it.

Regional conferences

Senior ASCL representatives have attended conferences organised by Regional Schools Commissioners (RSCs) and the Teaching Schools Council (TSC) where they talked about the blueprint to an audience of school and system leaders.

There was interest in the ASCL blueprint from the point of view of developing a regional strategy. There was also a strong interest in the ASCL guidance on leading and governing groups of schools with multiple requests for copies (see more on the guidance in the feature by Director of Policy Leora Cruddas on page 16).

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LEADING READING